Undeclared allergen leads to salad recall

first_imgIndianapolis, In. — Caito Foods, LLC., an Indianapolis, Ind. establishment, is recalling approximately 242 pounds of fully cooked chicken salad product due to misbranding and an undeclared allergen, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. The products contain tree nuts (walnut), a known allergen, which is not declared on the product label.The ready-to-eat, fully cooked, not shelf stable chicken salad products were produced on August 31, 2018. The following products are subject to recall:  [View Label (PDF only)]15-oz. plastic clamshell packages containing “Derby City Chicken Salad WITHOUT Walnuts” with lot code “GHMW 243 03” and “Sell By: 09/04/18” on the label.The products subject to recall bear establishment number “P-39985” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations in Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky and Ohio.The problem was discovered after the firm received a consumer complaint.There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers’ refrigerators. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify that recalling firms are notifying their customers of the recall and that actions are being taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.Consumers with questions about the recall can call the distributor’s consumer line at (888) 449-9386. Members of the media with questions about the recall can contact Meredith Gremel, vice president of corporate affairs and communications, Caito Foods, LLC, at (616) 878-2830.last_img read more

Plans on stream for Caribbean Schoolboys and Juniors Boxing Championships

first_imgFROM May 12 to 14, Guyana will be hosting the second edition of the Caribbean Schoolboys and Juniors Boxing Championships, and according to sources, plans for the staging of the event are well on stream.The event will be staged at the National Gymnasium, Mandela Avenue and 12 countries, including Guyana, are expected to participate in the event, which is the brainchild of Guyana Boxing Association (GBA) president Steve Ninvalle.According to Ninvalle, Trinidad and Tobago, Suriname, Jamaica and St Lucia have confirmed their participation for the three-night tournament and he (Ninvalle) is confident that Barbados, Cayman Islands, Grenada and Bahamas will each send a team to Guyana.Ninvalle said the French-speaking nations of Guadeloupe, Martinique and French Guiana have signalled their intentions to also send representative teams.According to Ninvalle, it is expected that the programme will see approximately 100 boxers and officials arrive in Guyana for the tournament.The source said the GBA is expected to encamp a team of boxers in the coming week after the successful staging of the Pepsi Under-16 tournament, which was held at the Andrew `Six Head’ Lewis Gym in Albouystown.The Caribbean Schoolboys and Juniors tournament was first staged here last year.last_img

FDA urges eateries to slim down

first_imgWASHINGTON – Those heaping portions at restaurants – and doggie bags for the leftovers – may be a thing of the past, if health officials get their way. The government is trying to enlist the help of the nation’s eateries in fighting obesity. One of the first things on their list: cutting portion sizes. With burgers, fries and pizza the Top 3 eating-out favorites in this country, restaurants are in a prime position to help improve people’s diets and combat obesity. At least that’s what is recommended in a government-commissioned report released Friday. The report, requested and funded by the Food and Drug Administration, lays out ways to help people manage their intake of calories from the growing number of meals prepared away from home, including at the nation’s nearly 900,000 restaurants and other establishments that serve food. “We must take a serious look at the impact these foods are having on our waistlines,” said Penelope Slade Royall, director of the health promotion office at the Department of Health and Human Services. The 136-page report prepared by The Keystone Center, an education and public group based in Keystone, Colo., said Americans now consume fully one-third of their daily intake of calories outside the home. And as of 2000, the average American took in 300 more calories a day than was the case 15 years earlier, according to Agriculture Department statistics cited in the report. Today, 64 percent of Americans are overweight, including the 30 percent who are obese, according to the report. It pegs the annual medical cost of the problem at nearly $93 billion. Consumer advocates increasingly have heaped some of the blame on restaurant chains like McDonald’s, which bristles at the criticism while offering more salads and fruit. The report does not explicitly link dining out with the rising tide of obesity, but it cites studies suggesting a connection. The National Restaurant Association said the report, which it helped prepare but does not support, unfairly targeted its industry. The report encourages restaurants to shift the emphasis of their marketing to lower-calorie choices, and include more such options on menus. In addition, restaurants could jigger portion sizes and the variety of foods available in mixed dishes to cut calories. Bundling meals with more fruits and vegetables also could help. And letting consumers know how many calories are contained in a meal also could guide the choices they make, according to the report. Simeon Holston, 33, called more disclosure an excellent idea as he lunched on a sausage-and-pepperoni pizza at a downtown Washington food court. “OK, I am going to eat junk food regardless, but let me eat the junk food that’s going to cause me less damage,” he said. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE11 theater productions to see in Southern California this week, Dec. 27-Jan. 2160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more