first_imgA book launch charting the History of Dunfanaghy Boxing Club will be held – Saturday 16th of January at 8pm prior to the club’s first tournament of 2016, in the Oznam Centre in Dunfanaghy. Compiled by James Woods – The History of Dunfanaghy Boxing Club will be priced at €10 on the night. Here is a short piece James sent into us regarding the book launch this weekend.“After another unscripted stop, the German tourist decided to take the umpteenth picture of a cow grazing in a field, and asked Josie, if he had any idea what the cow might be thinking? Not sure how to reply to such a question, an impatient Josie said “the cow is probably thinking what the hell are you looking at?”As everyone is keenly aware, there is a beginning to everything, but the strength of the seed that’s planted at the start will ultimately determine its end.If its down to survival or determination of the fittest, then I think that would be some of the interlinking components that has guaranteed Dunfanaghy Boxing club its well deserved place in a local historical context, and a niche in parish folklore for its ‘refusal to wane into obscurity. This is down in no small part to trainer/coach Eddie Harkin especially, and many of those who first entered the old Market house to get their heart pumping in its embryonic years.This compelling but easy to read book was years in the making, by that I mean it was no more than an idea in need of further coaxing, that poked its head up every now and again when someone started recounting stories of having trained or boxed at the club.Its not all about the boxing, its about the people in the background as well.It was while having a chat with Micky Durning (one of the clubs founders) in Dunfanaghy that the idea got kick-started into action, whereby deciding that a pen was needed to take it to the next level.The fact that it is being launched at the beginning of the centenary year of the 1916 rising is an unplanned bonus which will make it that bit more special in years to come.I spent a fair few evenings at odd intervals throughout 2015 jotting down bits and pieces on one of those outdated schoolbook jotters at the various houses I called too, as part of my quest. These are people who occupy positions in all walks of life who have made some enlightening contributions, some are retired, and some still going about their daily business as if there weren’t enough hours in the day.While a few in the know” were expecting me to knock on their door, others didn’t, but were excited by the prospect once I explained what my mission was, I was offered tea in some houses and none in others, but the craic was good as I penned some exhilarating stories and dug up a few ageing dust covered photos in the process.Every sporting organisation or club have had their fair share of ups and downs. And each has its their own specific story to tell.As far as I’m aware this book will be leading the way in respect of an amateur boxing club having its, at times unplanned moments both inside the ring and outside charted in a way that will bring smiles to peoples faces, and rejuvenate distant memories. The early years of participating in tournaments come about, during a dark and gloomy era of hard work and little reward with emigration being the release valve to a brighter future in many respects.Travelling to take part in tournaments in Derry, Belfast or Dublin was not as pleasurable an experience as it can be today.Roads were full of dangerous bends, lorries and buses pumped out black smoke and sheep and cows had much the same rights to the roadways as you had.Intimidating border crossings were an experience that was not looked forwarded too, they consisted of massive steel structures manned by heavily armed and very nervous British soldiers.It was difficult to factor in waiting times spent at these border crossings or indeed the countless checkpoints that appeared at any juncture in the ongoing journey on roads that had more turns than a jiving class, or more twists than Joan Burton taking canoeing lessons in Storm Frank.Since the club was founded in 1978, and up to the present day, hundreds of young fellows have gone through the doors, (girls having become a welcome addition in recent years due in no small way to watching with excitement Ireland’s gifted Olympic Gold medallist, Katie Taylor making short work of her opponents) some stuck it out for a few nights, while others went for weeks, months and years in pursuit of titles and trophy’s, before becoming mentors to a younger generation of boxers.Every young fellow or girl who takes up the sport today, dreams of following in the footsteps of Irelands first medal winner, John McNally who won a silver medal at Bantamweight in the Helsinki Olympics in 1954.In the following years up to the 1980s, Fred Tiedt, John Caldwell, Freddie Gilroy, Antoney Byrne, Jim McCourt and Hugh Russell brought home Bronze medals.Michael Carruth brought us our first Gold and Wayne McCullough a Silver in 1992.Kenny Egan Silver, Paddy Barnes Bronze and Darren Sutherland Bronze in 2008.In 2012 Katie Taylor won Gold, John Joe Nevin took Silver while Paddy Barnes and Michael Conlan took Bronze. Since then Ireland’s boxers have won a plethora of medals at World and European levels.In order to win medals, once you push the boat out you have to keep rowing, and that takes dogged  determination and no small measure of guidance.Dunfanaghy boxers have acquired a number of gold medals at European and world levels over the years, and will no doubt add to that tally in the future.Once again their ever dependable trainer Eddie Harkin deserves full credit for that exemplary record, and I hope this book adds to the trophy shelf, and to your bookshelf if you want to own a copy from the limited number being published.”BOOK LAUNCH ON HISTORY OF DUNFANAGHY BOXING CLUB THIS SATURDAY was last modified: January 11th, 2016 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img


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